Grown

Learn about what makes our products so special.

Macadamia Nuts

1) Our macadamia nut orchards in historic Kapulena along the Hamakua Coast, not far from where the very first tree in Hawaii was planted in the 1880’s.

2) Macadamia nut trees can be fairly large once they reach full growth. There are several different varieties planted here on the Big Island and each variety varies in shape, size, leaf structure, and even the size of the nuts.

3) Macadamia nut flowers grow in beautiful long white clusters 6-12” long, called racemes.

4) We get excited when we start to see these little green keiki macadamia nuts. The green outer layer is called the husk. Inside is a brown hard shell layer that protects the kernel within it.

5) Macadamia nuts naturally drop from the tree when mature. The husk also splits and turns brown. It is important to harvest them as soon as possible for freshness and to minimize spoilage.

6) Harvested macadamia nuts ready to have the husk removed.

7) This dehusking machine removes the outer husk before it gets dried and cracked.

8) Here are macadamia nuts with outer husk removed, ready to be dried and cracked.

9) We use this huge “stadium” dryer that blows a steady flow of warm air up through the nuts to dry them down to a safe storage moisture and to allow for easier cracking.

10) Let’s get cracking! It takes 300 pounds of pressure to crack a macadamia nut! Our nut crackers come all the way from Australia and use knives to gently break open the shell and release the precious kernel.

11) After cracking, we use a rotating screen (trommel) with different hole sizes to sort the kernel by size.

12) Our optical sorter uses a high speed camera to identify any imperfections in the kernel and shoots a high speed jet of air to kick out the imperfect kernel. Fun Fact: Our historic factory was the first to use an optical sorter on macadamia nuts in the 90’s.

13) Macadamia nut kernels go through a quick roast to be sure they are dry enough for storage and food safety.

14) The packing room. Here we give our kernels one more visual inspection with a human eye and then vacuum pack the kernels into 25 lb cases ready for our kitchen.

15) Our kitchen then works its magic turning our farm fresh macadamia nuts into all of your favorite treats.

16) Quality control. Keikis are NUTS for mac nuts.

COFFEE

1) Our coffee orchard in gorgeous Pa’auhau “Land of Sunshine” on the Hamakua Coast of the Big Island.

2) The trees go through careful pruning, leaving only 3-4 vertical branches allowing for proper sunlight and airflow and maintained at a height that can be easily harvested by hand.

3) These beautiful coffee flowers will produce coffee cherry in about 9 months. By the way, did you know coffee is a fruit and actually called a cherry while growing on the plant?

4) Once pollinated, the flowers slowly form the green immature coffee cherry. With coffee, green does NOT mean go. We hand pick every coffee cherry, so we’ll leave this one alone until it’s perfectly ripe and red.

5) A beautiful sight, this red coffee cherry is ready to be picked by hand. Each cherry will have two seeds (future coffee beans) inside it. Sometimes mother nature blesses us with a single large round seed/bean known as a peaberry.

6) The first post-harvest step is a refreshing swim. Once it’s picked by hand, the coffee cherry goes into the float tank where the perfectly ripe and sound cherry sinks to the bottom and any damaged, over ripe, or immature cherry floats off the top.

7) Next, the fleshy pulp of the cherry is removed (pulped), exposing the precious cargo inside.

8) Once the pulp is removed, this stage of the coffee bean is called parchment and has a slimy outer layer called mucilage.

9) The coffee parchment ferments in these tanks for 48 hours to remove any remaining mucilage as well as enhance the flavor.

10) After spending 2 days in the fermentation tanks, the parchment will spend another 5-7 days on these drying racks to remove moisture, allowing the parchment to be safely stored at a stable state.

11) Once dry, the parchment is placed in burlap bags ready to be sent to the mill. A beautifully satisfying sight!

12) The parchment still has a protective hull around the bean, so a mill is used to remove the hull, exposing the next stage, a green bean.

13) Here is a green bean…yes it is FINALLY ready to get roasted!

14) Roasting coffee is both an art and a science. Roasting at different time and temperatures create different flavors.

15) All the same beans, but roasted at different temperatures. The dark roast is rich and smooth, with very subtle notes of chocolate. The medium roast is bold and assertive. The light roast is the most complex, with lighter notes of butterscotch and caramel.

16) Finally what you have been waiting for, a cup of our 100% Hamakua coffee.

Come on In

Weekdays

8AM -4PM

Weekends

Saturday: Parker Ranch School Market 7:30am - 12pm

Contact Us

Phone

(808)775-1821

Email

aloha@ahualoafarms.com

Address

45-3279 Mamane St. Honokaa, HI 96727

Come on In

Weekdays

8AM -4PM

Weekends

Saturday: Parker Ranch School Market 7:30am - 12pm

Contact Us

Phone

(808)775-1821

Email

aloha@ahualoafarms.com

Address

45-3279 Mamane St. Honokaa, HI 96727